What to Do and See at the Roman Algerian Site of Tiddis

What to Do and See at the Roman Algerian Site of Tiddis

The ruins of the city of Tiddis are few kilometers away from Constantine and they served as protection during the era of the Romans. Tiddis itself occupies a picturesque fortified position at the entrance of the Gorges du Khreneg. The resemblance to the site of Constantine had incited the population to name it El Ksentina Kdima or the old Constantine.

A recently constructed road of 28 kilometers links Tiddis and Constantine. After one last turn on this winding road and you will be suddenly facing the wilderness of the mountains, dominated by rocky formations. The modern neighborhoods are adding a touch of ochre in the middle of green landscapes. The old Roman road winding up into the mountains gives access to various terraced assembled buildings some of which are carved into the rocks. The ruins are spread over forty hectares. They can be divided into three groups – the ones occupying the plateau, those on the eastern side and the ones at the foot of the cliff.

Climbing the Roman Site of Tiddis
Climbing the Old Roman Road in Tiddis on an Algerian Group Tour

The plateau is cut in two by a wall that starts from the highest point (Ras El Dar) and follows a North-South direction. The eastern part of the plateau has been recently rebuilt. Leaning against Ras El Dar, here lays a sanctuary indicating that the acropolis had a religious role while being a military destination.

The main buildings discovered during the excavation expeditions occupy the eastern slope. An imposing door bearing a bow ornament gives access to the city. A paved road leads to the first small place that served as the market. The upper terrace has a small forum where there are three open rooms that have no connection between each other, but are all three facing east.

Exploring the Ruins in Tiddis
Exploring the Ruins in Tiddis

The small town seems to have been the home of many religious communities that all left behind the sanctuary of Mithra, the temple of Vesta, and the sanctuary Cereres. At some of the higher places of the city, African deities have also been found. Archaeologists have discovered a large collection of pottery which existed during the Middle Ages.

While visiting Tiddis, you will for sure notice a considerable number of water tanks which speaks of the absence of constant sources. The large tanks were filled with water from the mountain springs. The inscription in one of the cliffs dated from the middle of the 3rd century celebrates the proceedings of collecting water. The ancient Roman ruins are one of the most remarkable heritages of the region.

Exploring Tiddis in Algeria

If you are interested in visiting Tiddis in Algeria, our travel experts are happy to assist you to plan an unforgettable Algeria tour.

About the author

Kevin Dyck is the founder of Mosaic North Africa and has over 11 years experience living in North African countries. He is an Arabic speaker with a passion for travelers to encounter the diverse cultures and natural beauty found throughout the North Africa region. He currently lives in and works for MNA from Tunis, Tunisia.

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